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67% of UK employees consider social relationships at work important

Capterra UK research reveals that for the majority of UK employees, having work relationships is one of the key factors for staying in their current job
October 12, 2022
67% of UK employees consider social relationships at work important

Capterra UK research reveals that for the majority of UK employees, having work relationships is one of the key factors for staying in their current job. However, while 71% of on-site workers and 67% of hybrid workers say it is somewhat or extremely important to have work friends, only 46% of remote workers say the same. Meanwhile, as many as 36% of workers have remote colleagues on their team that they have never met.

According to the survey, more than half (54%) of workers say work-life balance is the top factor influencing job satisfaction onsite and in the hybrid or remote work environment, while 40% valued job security the most. Compensation, relationships with coworkers, and doing something they enjoy are additional elements that influence job satisfaction.

The order of preference of these factors influencing job satisfaction vary amongst different types of workers. For example, remote employees rate compensation (31%) more than relationships with coworkers (23%), while for on-site and hybrid workers, the order of importance is reversed.

The survey also showed that staff turnover can influence employees’ investment in work relationships, with more than half (51%) of employees saying that having a high staff turnover made it less likely for them to spend time cultivating connections with coworkers, although remote workers are less influenced by this; In contrast to 9% of on-site employees and 7% of hybrid employees, 22% of remote workers in organisations with a higher turnover strongly disagree that it affected their engagement in professional relationships.

Since the COVID-19 pandemic started in January 2020, 47% of employees say that their company has not held any virtual social events and 43% say their company has not organised any in-person events. Only 42% of respondents have participated in at least one voluntary, social event in person hosted by their employers, such as a happy hour or office party, although two-thirds of respondents (66%) indicated they were somewhat or extremely likely to participate in voluntary in-person or online social activities hosted by their companies.

Capterra UK Content Analyst, Eduardo Garcia Rodriguez, says:

“Employees today prioritise work-life balance and job balance. Still, HR teams should recognise the importance of nurturing relationships between co-workers and acknowledging the differences between on-site, hybrid and remote workers. The latter may seem slightly more disengaged when it comes to investing in work relationships or being affected, for example, by staff turnover.

However, we should note a third of respondents work with teammates that they have never met in person and that two-thirds of respondents stated that they were somewhat or extremely likely to participate in social activities hosted by their companies. This shows that HR teams must find ways to build social connections that can be tailored to all three types of employees.”

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